Another contender for Hammersmith’s worst piece of public art

The great American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, said “A doctor can bury his mistakes, but an architect can only advise his client to plant vines“.

Perhaps when the owners of Windsor Plaza on Hammersmith Road bought this sculpture they already had the planting scheme in mind.

Unfortunately it’s a little more visible in winter.

No doubt it was put in place under one of those arrangements where a developer makes a public contribution as part of receiving permission for their development.

My feeling is that most people would prefer these contributions to be spent on more useable enhancements to our shared public spaces – seating or planting or play equipment – or fountains.

Purchasing art by Committee is a recipe for disaster – or let us be ready with the shrubbery and the vines.

Is a green space a green space when it is full of nettles?

When I was a Councillor in Avonmore & Brook Green I enjoyed doing “walkabouts” around the Lytton Estate with Council officers and local residents.  We always stopped to look at two derelict “green spaces” outside Burne Jones House.  These sit on the same side as the access stairs and all the residents’ front balconies and doorways.  They are the main green spaces that all residents in the block walk past day in day out, year in year out.

It is a pity then that these spaces remain derelict and uncared for year after year. In the picture shown one of the spaces is indeed green, but those are nettles that you see.  When we did the walkabouts nobody had any doubt that these spaces were within the remit of the gardening and site maintenance teams to care for.  Everyone agreed that something needed to be done.  We ticked boxes, made notes, and took actions.  Except that we collectively didn’t.  The gardens remain the same.

Other parts of the Lytton Estate are beautifully cared for.  But it’s not acceptable to cut corners and manage budgets by leaving this or that area out.  Particularly when they are as prominent as these little squares are for hundreds of residents.  Sure, after many years of neglect the soil is likely to be awful – and with the low railings the areas are a magnet for dogs.  Officers also said that sometimes, not too deep under these sorts of spots, you can find stony rubble.  A corner cut, many years ago.

Nevertheless the right answer is not to do nothing year after year. These spots need to be prioritised for some love and care. After all the walkabouts, notes, actions, and agreements, I thought we would have spring bulbs in 2018.  Could we make that 2019?

Is this Hammersmith’s worst piece of public art?

This sculpture stands in the grounds of Charing Cross hospital.  I walk past it most weeks and have always been impressed by its seemingly audacious meaninglessness.

My father died in Charing Cross hospital.  So did my beloved great aunt.  So when I walk through the grounds I’m usually thinking of them and the meaning of our life here on this earth.

That brings me to Shakespeare:

Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

 

Many of us do not share this bleak outlook.  But perhaps the sculptor did. Perhaps the sculpture too, signifies absolutely nothing.